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FarmPolicy.com Monday News Update

Recall that earlier this month, USDA updated its U.S. Farm Sector Income Forecast and noted that, “Net farm income is forecast to be $73.6 billion in 2015, down nearly 32 percent from 2014’s forecast of $108 billion. The 2015 forecast would be the lowest since 2009.”

Scott Irwin, an agricultural economist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, noted that, “It’s neither happy times nor is the sky falling in terms of agriculture incomes.”

However, Reuters news published a disconcerting article on Monday which stated that, “Across the U.S. Midwest, the plunge in grain prices to near four-year lows is pitting landowners determined to sustain rental incomes against farmer tenants worried about making rent payments because their revenues are squeezed.”

The article noted that, “Some grain farmers already see the burden as too big. They are taking an extreme step, one not widely seen since the 1980s: breaching lease contracts, reducing how much land they will sow this spring and risking years-long legal battles with landlords.”

Meanwhile, a separate Reuters article over the weekend focused on the issue of genetically modified crops in India.

Details on these two Reuters articles can be found at FarmPolicy.com.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday that it will “likely take months for the backlog to clear” at West Coast Ports after this weekends resolution of the labor dispute there.  Labor Secretary Tom Perez discussed his role in resolving the dispute Monday morning on MSNBC and CNBC television.

Monday’s papers also included a look at the ongoing budget showdown regarding the Department of Homeland Security. The impetus for the dispute stemmed from executive branch action on immigration policy.  Meanwhile, a subsequent federal court ruling temporarily stopping executive branch implementation of the that policy has added to the complexity of how to resolve the dispute.

An article on the front page of Monday’s Wall Street Journal noted that, “Senate Republicans, still mulling their options, are most likely to end up supporting a short-term extension of the agency’s current funding.” Also, Nathan Koppel reported today at The Wall Street Journal Online that, “The Obama administration on Monday asked a federal court to allow it to continue implementing the president’s immigration plan, which was temporarily blocked last week by a Texas judge.”

News with potentially negative implications for the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade negotiations and Japan unfolded on Monday.

Robin Harding reported today at The Financial Times Online that, “Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, has lost an important ally on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal after his agriculture minster resigned in a scandal over political donations.”

The FT article added that, “The resignation matters because Mr Nishikawa is a longstanding member of the LDP’s ‘agricultural tribe’. He acted as a firewall for Mr Abe against internal party critics on trade deals and farm reform.

“Negotiators are near a deal on the huge TPP agreement, and agricultural reform is one of Mr Abe’s top priorities this year, so the loss of Mr Nishikawa is a blow to the prime minister’s agenda.”

Also today at FarmPolicy.com is a summary of a recent USDA- Economic Research Service report highlighting agricultural trade issues with China, as well as a look at an ERS publication on wetlands and the Farm Bill.

Keith Good