FarmPolicy

July 22, 2019

Bird Flu Issues

Samantha Masunaga reported late last week at the Los Angeles Times Online that, “A ‘limited number’ of turkeys at Butterball contract farms in Missouri and Arkansas have been diagnosed with H5N2 avian influenza, a Butterball spokeswoman said.”

Reuters writer Tom Polansek reported on Saturday that, “The U.S. Department of Agriculture has identified the first infection of a virulent strain of avian flu in poultry in Kansas, confirming the virus has spread into a migratory bird route that runs through the center of the country.

“The discovery of the H5N2 flu strain in a backyard chicken and duck flock in a county just outside Kansas City, Kan., is certain to lead to expanded restrictions on U.S. poultry exports from top trading partners like Mexico and Canada.

“The infection, confirmed on Friday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first case in an established migratory bird route, known as the central flyway, that stretches roughly north-south from Montana to Texas.”

The article noted that, “Major buyers of U.S. poultry have already restricted imports from other states that have recently been infected with the same flu strain.”

AP writer Steve Karnowski reported on Saturday that, “Animal health experts and poultry growers are scrambling to determine how a dangerous new strain of bird flu infected poultry flocks in four states — and to stop it from spreading.

“Avian influenza is common in wild migratory waterfowl but doesn’t usually harm them. But the H5N2 strain is deadly when it spreads to commercial poultry. It can wipe out a flock of tens of thousands of birds in a few days, as it did at a farm last month in Minnesota, the nation’s top turkey-producing state. The same strain soon turned up on two farms in Missouri and one in Arkansas.

The vast majority of turkeys and chickens in the U.S. spend their lives confined indoors to protect against disease. Yet, as the infections show, viruses can still reach them — tracked in by humans or rodents; carried on trucks, equipment, crates and egg flats; passed from waterfowl to shore birds that find their way into a barn.”

The AP article noted that, “Minnesota confirmed its outbreak March 4, the first H5N2 found in the Mississippi flyway, a major bird migration route. The Missouri and Arkansas cases were confirmed this week. The only known commonality among those states is the flyway. Meanwhile, samples from a Kansas backyard flock of chickens and ducks tested positive for the strain late this week; the affected flock is in a county just west of the Mississippi flyway.

Why it showed up at these locations simultaneously is a mystery, though [Dr. Carol Cardona, an avian influenza specialist at the University of Minnesota] and other experts suspect waterfowl or other wild birds. Meanwhile, officials are keeping an eye on the workers who had contact with the infected flocks, and producers are tightening their standard biosecurity measures, which include putting on sanitary clothing and showering on their way in and out of barns.”

Saturday’s AP article also pointed out that, “Some countries also use those bans to protect their markets from cheaper foreign products, according to Dr. Donna Carver, extension veterinarian at North Carolina State University. ‘There’s not always a scientific reason,’ she said.”

A news release on Friday from the National Chicken Council stated that, “In light of the recent detections of avian influenza (AI) in the United States, the U.S. poultry industry would like to assure the public that detailed response plans are in place for controlling the spread of the virus and for eliminating the virus entirely. The U.S. government and poultry industries have sophisticated systems and techniques to detect the introduction of the virus into a commercial poultry flock and have proven methods to quickly eliminate the virus. The U.S. poultry industry has a strong avian influenza testing and detection program administered by the federal National Poultry Improvement Plan, in addition to each state’s individual response plan. Poultry farmers also maintain strict biosecurity measures year-round, keep their flocks protected from wild birds and routinely test flocks for avian influenza.”

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