FarmPolicy

May 29, 2017

Antibiotics and Livestock Production

The Los Angeles Times editorial board indicated in today’s paper that, “On Tuesday, the U.N General Assembly will hold a high-level meeting to discuss one of the greatest contemporary threats to global public health. Not war, not Ebola, not Zika — but antibiotic-resistant microbes.

“Scientists and public health officials have been warning for decades that overuse of antibiotics would inevitably lead to a rise of bacteria that have adapted to the drugs and developed a resistance to them.”

After pointing out that, “Already, authorities say that slightly more than 2 million people in the U.S. are sickened each year from antibiotic-resistant microbes. About 23,000 of them die,” the opinion item added that: “Human overuse isn’t the only factor. More than 70 percent of the use of medically important antibiotics (that is, the ones developed to treat human illnesses) is by the agriculture industry for disease prevention and control and for growth production of livestock, though the latter is on the wane since federal guidelines were released in 2013 restricting use. Antibiotics are routinely added to livestock feed and water to keep animals from getting infections. Just as in humans, this overuse helps create antibiotic resistant strains.

“Perplexingly, overall use of antibiotics in livestock has increased slightly since the federal guidelines went into place. Some consumer groups have called for the FDA prohibit the use of antibiotics for disease prevention in animals, saying the the agricultural industry is still too reliant on prophylactic use. Though an outright ban on disease-prevention may be excessive, clearly more needs to be done to rein in overuse.

“Perhaps this can be answered by California in the next few years. Last year the state adopted the strictest law in the nation limiting antibiotic use in agriculture. Once it goes into effect in 2018, we’ll start to get better data that could shape an effective national policy on antibiotic use for livestock.”

And Geoffrey Mohan reported in today’s Los Angeles Times that, “Panera Bread and Chipotle Mexican Grill passed with flying colors, but KFC and Olive Garden were among the laggards in commitments to eliminate medically important antibiotics from their meat and poultry supply chains, according to a new report.

Strong progress nonetheless was made across the top 25 fast-food and casual dining retailers, suggesting that public pressure has helped slow the meat and poultry industry’s routine use of antibiotics that are critical to human health, according to the report released Tuesday by five consumer, environmental and public health groups.”

The article added that, “Subway, which last year received an F rating in the report’s inaugural edition, rose to a B for its commitment announced earlier this year to eliminate antibiotics across its entire menu. Last year, the restaurant chain did not even respond to the survey and did not offer public details of its antibiotics policies, the groups reported. Starbucks, which again earned an F rating, has maintained a similar silence for two years running.

McDonald’s rose a half grade, to C-plus in the wake of its decision earlier this year to eliminate antibiotics from its chicken supply.”

Today’s L.A. Times article also stated that, “Activists estimate that about 40% of the chicken supply chain is or will soon be free of antibiotics that are important to human health. A commitment by KFC, said [Sasha Stashwick, senior advocate for food and agriculture at the Natural Resources Defense Council], ‘could tip the industry over the 50% mark.’

“But the beef and pork industries have been much slower in adopting more aggressive policies regarding antibiotic use.”

Meanwhile, Melanie Evans reported in today’s Wall Street Journal that, “A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found more widespread use by U.S. hospitals of powerful antibiotics designed to fight infections when less-robust antibiotics fail, a ‘worrisome’ development as bacteria grow increasingly immune to treatment, the researchers said.”

Ms. Evans noted that, “The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, found hospitals increasingly bypassed drugs considered the first line of defense against bacteria in favor of more potent antibiotics.”

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